guy99
guy99
3 posts
Joined March 2013

Powder drop variation

I'm having trouble with variability of powder drop while loading 9mm.  I'm using N340.  I adjust the drop, then when it seems correct, I run and measure 10 shells in a row.  They are all between 5.0gr and 5.2gr with most at 5.1 gr (that's my target).

 

I then load about 80 cartridges for testing.  Take them to the range and find that some will not cycle the gun.  I bring 20 home and disassemble them weighing the powder for each.  Four out of 20 (20%) have powder weights of 4.8 or 4.9gr.

 

What gives? The wingnut on the powder reset lever is tight. The only thing I notice is that some powder 'jumps' out as the shell plate advances.  This is a small amount, ceratinly not .1 gr.

 

 

rob tipping
rob tipping
28 posts
Joined January 2013

RE: Powder drop variation

guy99 i have had same problem i have learnd that each time you load you should rum 10-15 loads  checking powder every time you will have a diference of .2 or less most of the time i am told this is due to new equipment and once it is ran 1 lb or so of powder it gets coated on all the powder measure parts and becomes much more consittant as far as the powder spilling on advancement of shell plate remove plate & ball bearing and spring under ball needs to be trimed in VERY SMALL amounts so it moves smoother . so remember to run  old cases every time you load befor you start making real rnds use old so you do not have to deal with loaded primers hope this helps good luck & keep loading
guy99
guy99
3 posts
Joined March 2013

RE: Powder drop variation

Rob,

Thanks for the reply. I know I have run at least 10 through the powder drop and weighed the result before make rounds to use. Still had this problem. Also, I have run a little more than a pound of powder through the system.

One issue I have had is having the shell case get stuck on the powder funnel. It releases but does take a little force which does cause some shaking of the machine.

Must admit I'm a little leery of cutting the spring without guidance directly from Dillon.
dashmatrix
dashmatrix
14 posts
Joined January 2013

RE: Powder drop variation

here are some youtube fixes for this issue...

It's pretty common.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBLEmn1A-qY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6f-UsBCR28U
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCDUo4hk6aM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cor6mN4wED4

I know it sounds crazy but I'm amazed at all the terrific information I have found on YouTube on the XL 650. It's not just a bunch of kids lighting farts, and wrecking their bicycles any more.
rob tipping
rob tipping
28 posts
Joined January 2013

RE: Powder drop variation

i under stand being leery about cutting spring but i am told it is very minute amount maybe the youtube fixes will help as far as your cases sticking you may need to lower you decaper die it may not be sizing deep enough hope this helps . 
guy99
guy99
3 posts
Joined March 2013

RE: Powder drop variation

Rob,
Thanks for the reply. I went by the Dillon retail store, took my re-sized brass, my re-sizing die and my powder funnel. To make a somewhat long story short, they brought a piece of coarse brown 'scotch brite' out from the repair bench and used it on my powder funnel. I had tried this with the 'scotch brite' you buy for cleaning things (green or blue) with no effect. After working on the funnel with the brown stuff for a while, the funnel fits into the brass much better and the brass can be pulled off of the funnel without a lot of effort. I think that has solved the problem.

I asked to keep the little square of brown stuff but they couldn't let me have it.

So I went on a quest for some of my own. After a visit to Home Depot and three auto parts stores, I found some at a ACE Hardware. It was in the paint stripping section and was labeled 3M metal polishing pad. (not Scotch Brite)

I have included all this detail in the event that someone else may benefit from my experience.

I'm still working on the other problem although not having the funnel stick in the brass will help me operate more smoothly and hopefully with less jarring. I also took off the shell plate, lubed everything, and tried to make sure I had everything tightened down exactly right.

If I have to I will cut the spring but only after I have a spare in hand.

Thanks,

Guy
admin3
admin3
3 posts
Joined October 2008

RE: Powder drop variation

One thing to consider is the accuracy of the scale you are using to weigh the powder charges. Unless you are willing to spend several hundred or a thousand dollars, no reloading scale is accurate to more than +/-0.1 grain. If you are throwing 5.0 grains, your scale will register anywhere between 4.9 and 5.1 grains and still be within its error rate.

The shorter your case, the more potential for powder shaking out there is. Cut one half coil-no more-off of your detent ball spring under the shell plate. You can also slow your up-stroke as the powdered case nears the powder check (or bullet seating) die station.

Place your bullet on the powdered case just before it stops under the bullet seating die.

Hope this helps.

 

danielcp6
danielcp6
1 post
Joined December 2016

RE: Powder drop variation

I'd like to simply suggest slowing down with a short pause at the bottom of your down stroke. I attained a lot more consistency in my loads by doing just that. This is especially true for lighter/low density powders that tend to be clingy like WST. It just takes more time for them to physically make their way down the opening in the funnel to the bottom of the case. Extruded powders might not have as much of an issue in pistol caliber cases, but I've found that rifle cases do need a short pause, especially small bore, like .223. the same tends to be true for powder coming out of the hopper into the powder measure bar, although less time is needed. Without my handbook on me, I'm not sure what shape/profile your powder has, but regardless, gravity has to do it's thing in there. Perhaps by the time you complete your upstroke, there is sufficient time for all the powder to make it to the case, but I saw a difference in consistency by making that small change.