roninco
roninco
1 post
Joined October 2008

Crimped Primer Removal

Is the Dillon universal depriming die suitable to remove crimped primers from 5.56 cases? I have read posts on this forum of priming bolts and stems becoming bent and I wonder if the force required to remove the crimped primers is part of the cause. Whad do you feel is the most appropriate way to remove crimped primers?
dillon
Administrator
dillon
3,222 posts
Joined July 2007

RE: Crimped Primer Removal

The Universal Depriming Die will deprime Boxer-primed military brass with no problem. A berdan-primed case will break the pin, as will some Eastern European boxer-primed cases with undersized flash holes.
Fishobaby
Fishobaby
105 posts
Joined December 2017

RE: Crimped Primer Removal

Dillon wrote:
"The Universal Depriming Die will deprime Boxer-primed military brass with no problem. A berdan-primed case will break the pin, as will some Eastern European boxer-primed cases with undersized flash holes."

I think I encountered either an undersized flash hole or a very tightly crimped primer. Normally, I decap everything with a Lee but the pin bent then broke so, foolishly, I threw more money at that ten cent piece of brass and broke my Dillon .223 resizing die's decapping pin.

When I replaced the tip and there was extreme runout observed while screwing the die into the die head, I removed the "Complete Decap Assembly" and chucked-up the threaded part in the lathe. I observed .050" TIR and was amazed at what extremely light taps were required to bend the butter soft "Upper Decap Bolt" back into shape. I was certainly *not impressed* by this.
tet301
tet301
52 posts
Joined February 2016

RE: Crimped Primer Removal

When I decided to use my trim die to resize my .223 brass, I stopped using the Dillon .223 resize die emtirely. I switched to a Lee 45 acp resize die for all of my rifle decapping. Although I continue to be a devotee of Dillon dies, the Lee decapping rod assembly is particularly durable.
And YES! I fully understand the frustration of bending or breaking expensive tools to process a piece of brass.

Terry