dlb435
dlb435
1 post
Joined December 2008

450 JR

I decided to post this to help out those few of you that recently added an old 450 JR to your reloading gear. When I got my 450 JR I could find almost no information about this press. The 450 JR series was built in the early 1980’s so this design is now 30 years old. Dillon has very few parts left to support the press so be careful that the press is complete before you buy one.

The 450 JR was the forerunner of the SDB press. It uses the same shell plates and dies. There were three different models made; the models A, B and C. Models A and B have a standard 7/8 die station in position one and can be used to load rifle ammo. The model C uses only the SDB dies in station one and can only load pistol ammo. Just to help confuse things, there was also the “B” option. This was the Dillon powder measure installed in station two.

Dillon has no frame castings left, so if you break the frame, the press is dead. However, this is a very robust press and if it is not abused, the frame should last a lifetime. The design is very simple and only has about 80 parts. Dillon has reported that a very few customers have worn the press out. Keep the press clean and oiled. Don’t force things or try to load ammo not recommended by Dillon and you should be fine.

The good points of the 450 JR:

Simple, easy to care for and easy to see all of the working parts as the press operates.

Strong, for pistol ammo, this press is way over built.

Precise, all the ammo I have loaded with this press is right in spec.

SDB shell plates and dies fit this press and are available.

The bad points of the 450 JR:

Slow to operate, everything is done manually.

Few spare parts available.

Would I recommend this press? Yes

I’ve used several presses over the years and loaded thousands of rounds of ammo. There are always little failures when loading ammo. (cases get torn, primes fail to seat, powder charge get missed or doubled) The simpler the press is, the easer it is to recover from a failure. Single stage presses are the best for control.

The more automated a press is, the faster you can make ammo. The problem is recovering from a failure. Remove the bad shell and you can upset the reloading process. I find the 450 JR is one of the best presses you can use if you want to get maximum control over the process in a progressive press. If you want maximum speed; get a SDB.

aircavvietnam71
aircavvietnam71
8 posts
Joined January 2009

RE: 450 JR

   DLB435 - Greeting to you from Virginia , I too many moons ago started out with the 450 Jr. .   I found it to be a good learning tool in understanding the stages of producing a loaded cartage. I would not say the press was slow per-say when you compare it to the steps needed to loading  500 rounds on a R.C.B.S .   I did find it some what tedious to pick up and hand set each primer into the primer cup. Once I set up a rhythm , the loading process proceeded along at a "fair" rate.   Yes, the machine has to be manually indexed and and powder bar also manually operated. There is virtually nothing on the machine to brake - springs - only three if memory serves me well - one under the primer cup , the indexing ball spring and one for the turret.    Even though I've moved on to the XL650 with all its whistles and bells , this 450Jr. still works as good as the day I pulled it from the box.  And still have original box and paper work.  " You suppose  I could Barrett - Jackson this one off?.   I should also admit that I also have a R.C.B.S. press. I only use it for decap and resizing small amounts of brass before I throw the brass into the tumbler.   With that being said I guess I  should close this posting with the thought that I was pleased to see the posting for a 450Jr. . To this day a very good and durable machine.   Joe Andrews <aircavvietnam@yahoo.com>
Jim Skelton
Jim Skelton
1 post
Joined August 2017

RE: 450 JR

By now (8 years later) you've probably already figured this out, but I have a 450 JR, I've loaded thousands and thousands of rounds through it and still use it to this day for my 45 ACP. I use the press to decap and resize, then use a stand alone, hand priming tool, to re prime a bunch. Then back to the 450 for the rest. Goes quick and I've gotten great results. The only problem is that now, I want a 9mm and a 380 set of dies, and I don't know that I'll ever find them any more.
dillon
Administrator
dillon
2,820 posts
Joined July 2007

RE: 450 JR

Call us for caliber conversion parts. The earlier 450 Jrs use a conventional 7/8-14 thread size die in station 1, and Square Deal dies and shellplate in stations 2,3 and 4. The later 450 Jrs use Square Deal B dies and toolheads in all four stations. No problem